Operative Laparoscopy

Operative laparoscopy is minimally invasive surgery performed through flexible tubes (laparoscopes) with lighting and viewing capabilities. The tubes are inserted into the body through one or more small incisions in the skin. Laparoscopy can be done with a surgical robot assisting or one surgical hand assisting (with a hand port inserted) as in removal of a kidney resection of a colon. The procedure is most commonly used for gynecological, gastrointestinal, and urological patients but also is used in other specialties such as pulmonology and orthopedic surgery. It started from simple ablative procedures such as dividing adhesions, and today can be used for many cases of advanced complexity. The advantage is that many laparoscopic surgeries take place in the outpatient setting because it results in less pain, bleeding, and scarring, as well as a faster return to normal activity. Laparoscopes are a type of endoscopes, the first of which was invented and clinically used by a UAB gastroenterologist.

Clinical Trials

UAB is an active participant in research and clinical trials for Operative Laparoscopy. We encourage you to speak to your physician about research and clinical trial options and browse the link below for more information on clinical trials at clinicaltrials.gov.

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Clinical Trials